Rethinking National Security

A total rethinking of our expansive concept of national security, ...


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iPad Books - American History, European History

Now and Then Reader publishes short nonfiction iPad books. With a selection of original nonfiction titles, excerpts from forthcoming nonfiction books and reprints of nonfiction work we feel deserves to be read again, Now and Then iPad books are focused on material that is historically based but also has relevance for our world today. Now and Then iPad books are quick reads, ranging in length from 5,000 to 25,000 words or approximately 15 to 60 book pages and are also available on the Barnes and Noble Nook, Amazon Kindle and other popular mobile devices. To learn more about Now and Then iPad books, please browse the selection of titles highlighted below.

Is a College Education Still Worth the Price?

A Dean's Sobering Perspective

by Richard B. Schwartz

Education, United States History

A former dean looks at American higher education and finds the value of a college education now highly problematic.  With an insider's knowledge, he describes the hidden costs behind exploding tuition costs that are creating a two-tiered society.  

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Artificial Epidemics

How Medical Activism Has Inflated the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer and Depression

by Stewart Justman

United States History, U.S. History, Medical History

How the quest for early detection of prostate cancer and depression has led to mass screenings, which in turn have revealed an incidence of disease that is beyond common sense and cautious medical practice.  The entire process has led to patients who have been not helped but damaged. 

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Shaping the American Character

The Significance of the Frontier in American History

by Frederick Jackson Turner

United States History, American History, U.S. History

Turner here lays out his “frontier thesis,” which remains one of the key interpretations of American history. He argued that the circumstances of life on the western frontier were a determining influence on American character and institutions. 

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Why American Newspapers Gave Away the Future

by Richard J. Tofel

United States History, European History, Military History, American History, U.S. History, Essays

An insider’s assessment of the precipitous decline of large city papers in the United States, and the newspapers’ response to their problems, by an experienced newspaper executive. 

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How Iran Got The Bomb

The Twisted Path to a Nuclear Weapon

by Jeremy Bernstein

United States History, Political Science, European History, Military History, American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government

Jeremy Bernstein traces the circuitous route by which Iran secured the expertise to develop a nuclear capability. Since Iran’s program appears to be aimed at weapons production, he concludes, the time of decision for action is fast approaching.

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Firing the General

Harry Truman Tells How He'd Had Enough of MacArthur

by Merle Miller

United States History, Military History, American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government

No episode in the Truman years caused a greater uproar than his firing of Gen. Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. MacArthur wanted to expand the war; Truman sought a limited conflict. The always candid former president explains what happened. 

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The Historian and His Day

by J.H. Hexter

Introduction by Gertrude Himmelfarb

Essays, Historiography

 Hexter's subject—the nature of the historical enterprise—raises the perennially vexing question of  past- and present-mindedness in the writing of  history.  It addresses that issue in a notably down-to-earth, commonsensible, personal manner.  

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Don't Kill The Umpire

How Baseball Escaped Its Violent Past

by Peter Morris

U.S. History, Sports History, Essays, Sports

Baseball was not always a game of quiet courage played by gentlemen, as Peter Morris shows in this fascinating historical profile of the rise and fall of violence as a part of our national pastime. 

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