Dirty War

The brutal struggle for independence in French Algeria ripped apart ...


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United States History Titles

Browse our United States History titles listed below.

Oppenheimer's Lives

Reflections on the Father of the Atomic Bomb

by Jeremy Bernstein

United States History, Military History, American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government, Biography, Biography

Jeremy Bernstein remembers the “father” of the atomic bomb—a man unsure of his identity and scarred by the famous government hearing that took away his security clearance.

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Family Intervention, Ku Klux Klan Style

The Hooded Remedy for Social Misbehavior

by Thomas R. Pegram

United States History, American History, U.S. History

In the social unease that followed World War I, some groups sought to preserve white Protestant morality in the face of new challenges to the old order. A reborn Ku Klux Klan focused not on racial matters but on social behavior, with a peculiar, not-so-subtle intervention in family affairs. 

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The Hundred Days' War

Franklin Roosevelt Takes Command in the Depths of the Great Depression

by William E. Leuchtenburg

United States History, Political Science, American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government, Essays

When Franklin Roosevelt came to the White House, 13 million—roughly 25 percent of the work force—were unemployed. By the day of  his inauguration, thirty-eight states had closed their banks. Soon the nation would witness the most furious period of legislative activity in American history.

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The Art of Money-Getting

by P.T. Barnum

United States History, Philosophy, American History

The greatest showman of his age, P. T. Barnum was also the most gifted advocate for the Gospel of Success in nineteenth-century America. Barnum’s autobiography, The Life of P. T. Barnum, Written by Himself, which sold almost half a million copies, included the “Rules of Success.” They were also incorporated into his lecture, “The Art of Money-Getting,” which he delivered more than a hundred times. Horace Greeley thought it “worth a hundred-dollar greenback to a beginner in life.”

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Mostly He Won

Kubrick, Bobby Fischer and the Attraction of Chess

by Jeremy Bernstein

United States History, European History, American History, U.S. History, Sports History, Essays, Sports

The 1972 world championship chess match between Bobby Fischer and Boris Spassky was an event of international importance—and a media bonanza. Out of a heady cast of characters, Jeremy Bernstein fashions a tale of large personalities involved in an intense, brainy competition.

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Wounded Knee 1973: Still Bleeding

The American Indian Movement, the FBI, and Their Fight to Bury the Sins of the Past

by Stew Magnuson

United States History

In 1973 the American Indian Movement occupied the symbolic site of Wounded Knee village in a protest against the U.S. government. Stew Magnuson tells why the anger and resentment on both sides continues to this day.

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Peanuts, Popcorn & American Presidents

by Ray Robinson

United States History, American History, U.S. History, Sports History, Sports

No politician who yearns for the White House would dare turn his back on the National Pastime. Ray Robinson surveys the presidential attitude toward baseball since the early twentieth century, separating the enthusiasts from the pretenders.

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Mr. Dooley Now and Forever

Thoughts on Life and Politics from the Famous Turn-of-the-20th-Century Chicago Saloonkeeper

by Finley Peter Dunne

United States History, Political Science, American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government

Mr. Dooley, a turn-of-the-20th-century Irish saloonkeeper from Chicago’s Archer Avenue (“Ar-rchey Road,” he called it) on the city’s southwest side, was the creation of Finley Peter Dunne, a Chicago newspaperman. Mr. Dooley analyzed world affairs for the equally fictitious Mr. Hennessey, and his opinions went out to the real press and the reading public. They are current—and funny. The problems confronting America a hundred years ago are among those that remain unsolved today.

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