Now and Then Reader publishes original short form nonfiction for Kindle Singles, Apple Quick Reads, Kobo Books Short Reads and Barnes and Noble Nook Books. We concentrate on writings that are historically based but also have relevance for present day events with a focus on American History and European History.

Available for purchase through Amazon Kindle Books, Barnes and Noble Nook Books, Kobo Books and the Apple iBookstore, Now and Then nonfiction titles range from 5,000 to 25,000 words or approximately 15 to 60 pages in length.

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Most Popular

John F. Kennedy's Women

The Story of a Sexual Obsession

by Michael O'Brien

United States History, American History, U.S. History

Largely under the radar during Kennedy’s White House years was the president’s womanizing.  O’Brien details Kennedy’s near-pathological approach to women and sex, then beyond the farthest reaches of the media’s imagination.  Here is an astonishing piece of presidential history.

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Women in Slavery

Selections from her Journal of Residence on a Georgian Plantation, 1838-1839

by Frances Anne Kemble

United States History, American History, U.S. History

Married to a wealthy American slaveholder, Fanny Kemble recorded her experience on her husband’s estates from the perspective of an “insider” as well as an “outsider.” Her ability to translate life so vividly onto the page provided readers with a sense of being eyewitness to events.

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Firing the General

Harry Truman Tells How He'd Had Enough of MacArthur

by Merle Miller

United States History, Military History, American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government

No episode in the Truman years caused a greater uproar than his firing of Gen. Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. MacArthur wanted to expand the war; Truman sought a limited conflict. The always candid former president explains what happened. 

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Paris Under the Occupation

by Jean-Paul Sartre

Translated from the French with an introduction by Lisa Lieberman

European History, Philosophy, Military History

After France fell to Hitler’s armies in 1940, for more than four years the country lived under a German occupation that reinforced its shame and sapped its energies.  Afterward, Jean-Paul Sartre attempted to explain France's experience and repair the nation's tarnished reputation.

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The CIA's Secret Research on Torture

How Psychologists Helped Washington Crack the Code of Human Consciousness

by Alfred W. McCoy

American History

When the CIA first looked into effective methods of torture in the 1950s, it found two major sources of aid. The first was information gleaned by the Nazis during World War II from concentration-camp experiments. The second was the cooperation of professional psychologists, many with leading university positions, who agreed to conduct questionably ethical experiments to show how prisoners might be broken through psychological torture. Alfred McCoy here explores the sordid and often outrageous practices of the CIA and its helpmates.

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Emblems of Woe

How the South Reacted to Lincoln's Murder

by David Hardin

United States History

Lee’s surrender at Appomattox signaled an end to the Civil War and brought joy and relief to the North and its soldiers, and to the slaves in Confederate states. But the sudden shock of Lincoln’s assassination just five days later, on Good Friday, sullied the victory. As gloom and anger descended across the North, how was Lincoln’s death viewed in the war-ravaged South? Southerners might have been expected to cheer the death of their archenemy, but their reaction was more complex and far from predictable, as David Hardin shows.

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