Now and Then Reader publishes original short form nonfiction for Kindle Singles, Apple Quick Reads, Kobo Books Short Reads and Barnes and Noble Nook Books. We concentrate on writings that are historically based but also have relevance for present day events with a focus on American History and European History.

Available for purchase through Amazon Kindle Books, Barnes and Noble Nook Books, Kobo Books and the Apple iBookstore, Now and Then nonfiction titles range from 5,000 to 25,000 words or approximately 15 to 60 pages in length.

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Most Popular

Women in Slavery

Selections from her Journal of Residence on a Georgian Plantation, 1838-1839

by Frances Anne Kemble

United States History, American History, U.S. History

Married to a wealthy American slaveholder, Fanny Kemble recorded her experience on her husband’s estates from the perspective of an “insider” as well as an “outsider.” Her ability to translate life so vividly onto the page provided readers with a sense of being eyewitness to events.

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Hunting the Grizzly

by Theodore Roosevelt

American History, U.S. History, Sports History, Education

On his Dakota ranch, Theodore Roosevelt learned to ride Western style, rope, and hunt. Already at twenty-seven a serious historian and author, he began writing about the frontier life. His account of confrontations with grizzly bears shows us how unusual was this American president.

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Why American Newspapers Gave Away the Future

by Richard J. Tofel

United States History, European History, Military History, American History, U.S. History, Essays

An insider’s assessment of the precipitous decline of large city papers in the United States, and the newspapers’ response to their problems, by an experienced newspaper executive. 

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And We Shall Overcome

President Lyndon B. Johnson's Address to Congress in Support of the 1965 Voting Rights Act

by Lyndon B. Johnson

Introduction by Nicolaus Mills

American History

The important background and text of President Lyndon Johnson's 1965 Voting Rights speech to Congress. In his remarks Johnson challenged the moral values of Americans and ultimately won the greatest victory for black Americans since Emancipation. 

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Race Goes To War

Ollie Stewart and the Reporting of Black Correspondents in World War II

by Antero Pietila & Stacy Spaulding

United States History

American blacks entered World War II in a peculiar position. Could they fight for the freedom of others while their own country denied theirs? And could they fight honorably in a still segregated armed forces? This illuminating perspective on World War II reportage shows how questions of race followed troops to the battlefields and how black correspondents—allowed on the frontlines for the first time—reported it. 

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Stalin's Boots

In the Footsteps of the Failed 1956 Hungarian Revolution

by Lisa Lieberman

European History

Stalin’s death in 1953 and Khrushchev’s denunciation of the Soviet Union's repressive policies opened the door to unrest in Eastern Europe. The most instructive case was Hungary. There a strong nationalist tradition combined with a disdain for its Communist bosses to incite a spontaneous popular rebellion against one-party rule. The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 was quickly put down by Soviet tanks, but in its historical antecedents, its idealism, and the character of its major players it provided a textbook portrait of a revolt against autocratic power.  

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