Is a College Education Still Worth the Price?

A former dean looks at American higher education and finds ...


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U.S. History Titles

Browse our U.S. History titles listed below.

How Iran Got The Bomb

The Twisted Path to a Nuclear Weapon

by Jeremy Bernstein

United States History, Political Science, European History, Military History, American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government

Jeremy Bernstein traces the circuitous route by which Iran secured the expertise to develop a nuclear capability. Since Iran’s program appears to be aimed at weapons production, he concludes, the time of decision for action is fast approaching.

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Firing the General

Harry Truman Tells How He'd Had Enough of MacArthur

by Merle Miller

United States History, Military History, American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government

No episode in the Truman years caused a greater uproar than his firing of Gen. Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. MacArthur wanted to expand the war; Truman sought a limited conflict. The always candid former president explains what happened. 

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Don't Kill The Umpire

How Baseball Escaped Its Violent Past

by Peter Morris

U.S. History, Sports History, Essays, Sports

Baseball was not always a game of quiet courage played by gentlemen, as Peter Morris shows in this fascinating historical profile of the rise and fall of violence as a part of our national pastime. 

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The Quintessential American

Selections from The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

by Benjamin Franklin

United States History, American History, U.S. History

In his famous Autobiography, Franklin displays the iconic American virtues of thrift, ambition, hard work, self-improvement, and common sense. In these selections he reflects upon his rise and the self-taught lessons that brought his success.

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Enemies, A Love Story

The oral history of Siskel and Ebert

by Josh Schollmeyer

United States History, American History, U.S. History, Television History

Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel, competing Chicago film critics, started out as enemies in print.  When someone put them together on TV to critique coming attractions, they became legendary—and friends, but no less acerbic.  Witty and engaging, in the end they stood tallest when they stood together.

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Getting Connected

Radio and the Movies in the Daily Life of Americans, 1920-1940

by David E. Kyvig

United States History, American History, U.S. History

Early-20th-century electrification affected the daily lives of millions of ordinary Americans. Electric lights lengthened days and reshaped nights. As its use expanded, electricity prepared the way for radio and the movies, new marvels of the age. 

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Too Fantastic to Be True

The Failure of the Jewish Rescuers at the Onset of the Holocaust

by Raul Hilberg

United States History, European History, American History, U.S. History

Despite information about the plight of the European Jews, the major Jewish organizations in Europe and the U.S. either failed to act or failed to persuade governments to act. Even when the “final solution” became apparent, some leading Jewish figures remained unconvinced of the catastrophe.  

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Rethinking National Security

An Outmoded Concept Is Sapping America's Strength

by John Prados

United States History, Political Science, Military History, American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government, Essays

 The distinguished historian John Prados calls for a total rethinking of our expansive concept of national security. If we fail to make hard decisions about existential threats, he concludes, we will find ourselves in a death spiral as a nation.

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