Enemies, A Love Story

The witty, engaging story of how Ebert and Siskel, newspaper ...


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U.S. History Titles

Browse our U.S. History titles listed below.

The March to the Sea

Sherman Drives Across Georgia to Savannah

by William T. Sherman

Military History, American History, U.S. History

The most controversial Civil War general was William T. Sherman, an indelible figure whose march through Georgia and the Carolinas typified his unrelenting style of warfare that showed the South no quarter. Sherman’s Memoirs may not be as direct as Grant’s, but they make no compromise. They are the work of an intelligent and literate man who brought to modern warfare a new sensibility that was later to become a subject of ongoing debate. Here is his account of the march from Atlanta to Savannah in November and December 1864, the prelude to Confederate surrender.

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The Siege of Blair Mountain

Class Warfare and High Treason in West Virginia's Coalfields

by Robert Shogan

United States History, Political Science, American History, U.S. History

The so-called Roaring Twenties were not only about loose morality and a devil-may-care display of opulence. In the byways of America, working men and women were seeking labor justice and struggling against the entrenched powers of capitalism. Nowhere was this struggle more poignant and important than in the coalfields of West Virginia. There in the 1920s the United Mine Workers confronted the coal operators who sought to bust their union. The ensuing conflict, violent and bloody, had much to say about the future of relations between working people and their bosses in America.  

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The Apprenticeship of Alger Hiss

by R. Bruce Craig

United States History, Political Science, American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government

Alger Hiss’s turn toward the political left, leading to his association with Whittaker Chambers, is portrayed in Bruce Craig’s incisive account of Hiss’s early years, drawing upon previously untapped sources.

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The Cause and Cure of Hysteria

Harry Truman on the Fears of Americans

by Merle Miller

U.S. History

Throughout American history, unscrupulous politicians have stoked fear among the people by calling certain “outsiders” threats to society. Senator Joseph McCarthy’s anti-Communist crusade prompted Harry Truman to reflect on the nature of demagoguery. 

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